Skip to main content

Aadhaar now mandatory for death certificates

Aadhaar now mandatory for death certificates
Directive applicable across the country, except Jammu & Kashmir, Assam and Meghalaya
Come October 1, death certificates will be issued only after relatives of the deceased provide Aadhaar number to authorities, a government notification said on Friday.
The notification by the Office of the Registrar General, which functions under the home ministry, said an applicant is required to provide Aadhaar number or enrolment ID number (EID) of the deceased and other details as sought in the application for death certificate for the purpose of establishing the identity of the deceased.
However, if the applicant is not aware of the Aadhaar number or EID of the deceased, he or she will be required to provide a certificate that the deceased person did not possess Aadhaar number to the best of his or her knowledge, the notification said. The use of Aadhaar for the applicants of death certificate will result in  ensuring accuracy of the details provided by the relatives, dependents, acquaintances of the deceased.
“It will provide an effective method to prevent identity fraud,” it said.
The directive would be applicable for the residents of all states except Jammu and Kashmir, Assam and Meghalaya, for which a date would be notified separately.
“The Aadhaar number will be required for the purpose of establishing the identity of the deceased for the purpose of death registration with effect from October 1,” according to the notification.
The production of Aadhaar number will also help in recording the identity of the deceased person. Further, it will obviate the need for producing multiple documents to prove the identity of the deceased person.
The Registrar General has directed all states and Union Territories to ensure compliance by the registration authorities concerned and send a confirmation on or before September 1.
The notification also warned that if any false declaration is given by the applicant, it will be treated "as an offence" according to the provisions of the Aadhaar Act  and the Registration of Birth and Death Act.
The applicant's Aadhaar number will also be collected along with the Aadhaar number of the spouse or parents of the deceased.
The office of the Registrar General is the central authority to coordinate and unify the activities of chief registrar of birth and death in states and Union Territories.
Business Standard, New Delhi, 05 August 2017

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

At 18%, GST Rate to be Less Taxing for Most Goods

About 70% of all goods and some consumer durables likely to cost less

A number of goods such as cosmetics, shaving creams, shampoo, toothpaste, soap, plastics, paints and some consumer durables could become cheaper under the proposed goods and services tax (GST) regime as most items are likely to be subject to the rate of 18% rather than the higher one of 28%.

India is likely to rely on the effective tax rate currently applicable on a commodity to get a fix on the GST slab, said a government official, allowing most goods to make it to the lower bracket.

For instance, if an item comes within the 12% excise slab but the effective tax is 8% due to abatement, then the latter will be considered for GST fitment.

Going by this formulation, about 70% of all goods could fall in the 18% bracket.

The GST Council has finalised a four-tier tax structure of 5%, 12%, 18% and 28% but has left room for the highest slab to be pegged at 40%. A committee of officials will work out the fitment and the council…

Coffee-Toffee, the GST Debate Continues

Hundreds of crores of rupees in the form of taxes ride on the exact categorisation of products Is Parachute hair oil or edible oil? Is KitKat a chocolate or a biscuit? Is a Vicks tablet medicament or confectionery? For the taxpayer and the tax collector, this is much more than an exercise in semantics -hundreds of crores of rupees ride on the exact categorisation.
As the government moves closer to rolling out the goods and services tax (GST) on July 1, many such distinctions are being debated so that no ambiguity remains. Not just that, the government is revisiting old tax cases that were lost over product categorisation, according to people with knowledge of the matter, presumably with a view to making sure that revenue collections can be maximised. “In the past, several tax officers had challenged some of the product categorisations, including those in the retail segment, but lost out in court or at appellate level,“ said one of the persons. “Now we have a chance to go ahead with speci…

Deposit gush:-CA Institute Bats for Special Audit